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Class


“I’d gladly start a fund to subsidize Spooner so he won’t need to waste time on piffling things like stock and bonds when he can be writing more novels.”

Alison Bennet and Dan Loveman went to a Greek restaurant somewhere in Boston one night, and somewhere between the egg lemon soup and the souvlakia, they fell in love – and inadvertently set the stage for the greatest battle between hostile houses since Juliet Capulet met Romeo Montague.  That battle explodes in Class.

Blonde and striking Alison Bennett is the daughter of John Brattle Burr Bennett, icy Boston Banker and member in good standing of The Golf Club, to which the family has belonged for generations.  Dan Loveman, on the other hand, is the son of “Big Teddy” Loveman, President of Loveman Shoe Company, scion of a Polish cobbler from Poltusk, and charter member (star sapphire pinkie ring, rhinestone-eyeglassed wife and all) of the very exclusive Brookwood Country Club, where the colors are white and King David blue.

The Bennetts have never knowingly entertained a Jew in their home.  The Lovemans seldom entertain at all.  It is not, as they say, a match made in heaven.  Nevertheless, the affair between Alison and Dan escalates towards marriage – and the battle escalates towards war.

Class is the story of this war – a war fought in the boardrooms and bedrooms, on putting greens and ski slopes, in church and in temple.  It is the story of old money against new money, old values against new values.  It is the story of two star-crossed lovers who thought they couldn’t lose, which was their first mistake.

Tragedy?  Comedy?  Satire?  Define Class as you will, but one thing is certain.  It is a dazzling contemporary novel on one of the oldest themes of all.  Class.  Do you have it?

“I’d gladly start a fund to subsidize Spooner so he won’t need to waste time on piffling things like stock and bonds when he can be writing more novels.”

“Put a little more zap into J.P. Marquand, a little more zing into Louis Auchincloss… you get Class.

The Kansas City Star

“This is great entertainment, comparable to a good John O’Hara novel. Spooner evokes vividly the mores of his time.”

Publishers Weekly