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Do You Want to Make Money or Would You Rather Fool Around?


“It is a deep and cheerful probing of the psychology of personal investing from the point of view of someone who helps manage half a billion dollars of other people's money.”

Are you looking for the next big thing?  In these sixty-plus short pieces, prominent investment advisor and writer John D. Spooner shares an invaluable collection of insights and proven strategies you can use to make-and keep-more money in the market.

In a world overwhelmed with investment advice, Spooner offers something more precious-hard-won investment wisdom. He shares over 30 years of experience-in markets ranging from disastrous to unstoppable-along with savvy lessons that will lead you to a sound and highly profitable investment strategy.

You will also get a vivid behind-the-scenes look at the investment world’s volatile and fascinating mix of people, money, cunning, and luck-and a better understanding of how the pro’s really make more money on Wall Street.  If you’re ready to move beyond chasing the latest high-flying stock or over-hyped IPO, and get serious about making money, this book is a great place to start!

“Spooner knows his stuff; his first person tone is charming and engaging.”

USA Today

“Spooner is a national treasure.”

The Boston Globe

“Spooner’s devilishly funny insights into greed, fear, and investing in the stock market are right on target. His book is therefore not only entertaining, but enormously valuable reading for any investor.”

John Berendt, author of ‘Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil’

Now Spooner has summed up his distinctive approach to personal investing in a little book called “Do You Want To Make Money Or Would You Rather Fool Around?” It offers very different counsel from the myriad accounts of fabulous wealth creation in Silicon Valley that are now tumbling off the presses…. Instead, it is a deep and cheerful probing of the psychology of personal investing from the point of view of someone who helps manage half a billion dollars of other people’s money.

David Warsh, Boston Globe, October 19, 1999